Atlanta investment analyst becomes first fatality on Chattahoochee whitewater course

One of the last things that 46-year-old Alvin Lino did late Saturday afternoon was check in on Facebook at Whitewater Express, an outfitter than runs guided raft tours on the Chattahoochee River.

Less than three hours later, Lino, a real estate investment analyst for a large national firm, became the first fatality on the Chattahoochee whitewater course, which opened in May 2013.

Lino was in a raft that capsized at the first rapid on the 2.5-mile course that runs into downtown Columbus. He was unresponsive when he was brought back into the raft, Whitewater Express owner Dan Gilbert said.

Lino was taken to the bank on the Alabama side where river guides continued efforts to revive him until Phenix City emergency medical personnel arrived and took him to Jack Hughston Hospital. He was pronounced dead just before 8 p.m. at the hospital.

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Lino’s cause of death, according to Muscogee County Assistant Coroner Charles Newton, is accidental drowning.

Lino was a senior analyst at Marcus & Millichap, a national real estate investment firm based in Atlanta. A native of Belize City, Belize, he studied finance at Georgia State University in Atlanta and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University.

The flow on the Chattahoochee River Saturday when the high-flow trip was being conducted was 12,300 cubic feet per second in downtown Columbus, according to information provided by the National Weather Service’s office in Peachtree City, Ga.. What Whitewater Express calls its “Challenge Trip” usually runs in the evening when Georgia Power is releasing water from Oliver Dam. That trip is advertised on the Whitewater Express website at up to 13,000 cfs or higher.

According to information provided by Whitewater Express, the river flow at the time of the trip was 9,000 cfs, as ascertained by their guides.

Challenge Trips consist of two laps, with rapids ranging from Class II to IV, according to Whitewater Express. Trips happen between the hours of 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. All participants are given the option to opt out on the second lap and Lino chose to make the additional run, Gilbert said.

Gilbert said it was a normal high-flow trip. He did not say how many guides or boats were on the trip.

The guide on Lino’s raft was a first-year river guide, Gilbert said, but he had been trained by Whitewater Express. Like most of the tours, this one consisted of more than one raft and two highly experienced trip leaders who are certified in swift-water rescue, Gilbert said.

After making one pass on the course the group went back to the starting point, just below the North Highlands Dam near Bibb City.

The raft had gone through the initial rapid known as “Ambush,” when the guide turned around and went upstream in a technique known as “surfing the rapid.” All of the participants in the raft verbally agreed to surf the rapid, according to Whitewater Express.

All of the rafters were thrown from the raft during the surfing, Gilbert said.

Lino was wearing a life jacket, helmet and had gone through the pre-trip safety protocol, according to a release from Whitewater Express.

Related stories from Columbus Ledger-Enquirer

Man drowns after falling from raft on the rapids

“When this happened, it appeared everything was handled by normal protocol,” Gilbert said.

The whitewater course is managed by Uptown Whitewater Management LLC, a non-profit entity that grew out of Uptown Columbus Inc.

Uptown Whitewater Management LLC President Ross Horner said the organization is still reviewing facts and referred the Ledger-Enquirer to a statement it released Sunday afternoon.

“On behalf of Whitewater Management LLC, we are deeply saddened by this loss,” the statement read. “We would like to send our deepest condolences to his family and friends. We can not comment about specific details at this time, as we are working directly with all authorities involved in this matter. This is a tragic loss and we want to protect the family’s privacy while they mourn.”

Sunday morning, Whitewater Express ran one trip down the river then ceased operations when the river flow reached more than 20,000 cfs because of heavy rain and release upriver.

Whitewater Express also operates on the Nantahala River in North Carolina and the Ocoee River in Tennessee. The company has been in business since 1980 and this is the first death, Gilbert said.

“We are so sorry this incident happened yesterday,” Gilbert said. “We are a family-owned business and we take this personally. This is not just a personal thing for Whitewater Express, it is personal for Whitewater Management and this community. This is a personal loss.”

Because Lino was in the river, the Muscogee County coroner’s office responded. Newton said Saturday night they were going to send Lino’s body to Dekalb County for an autopsy.

That changed Sunday morning, Muscogee County Coroner Buddy Bryan said. The state crime lab declined to take the body because Lino, who listed a Mableton, Ga., home address, was pronounced dead in an Alabama hospital, Bryan said.

Lino’s body was to be turned over to Russell County Coroner Arthur Sumbry Jr., Bryan said.

The Muscogee County coroner’s office handled the notification of next of kin, Bryan said. A family member told the coroner that Lino had some medical conditions, including an enlarged heart, lupus and circulatory issues.

Chuck Williams: 706-571-8510, @chuckwilliams

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Additional Information About 6210 Overlook Rd, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092

6210 Overlook Rd, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092
6210 Overlook Rd, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092
Lot Description: Private Backyard

6210 Overlook Rd, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092 is a condo/townhome/row home/co-op for sale, and has been listed on the market for 10 days. 6210 Overlook Rd is in the Peachtree Corners neighborhood, which has a median listing price of $87,900. The median listing price for Peachtree Corners is 100% less than Peachtree Corners at $495,000, and 100% less than GA at $250,000. Nearby neighborhoods like have a median listing price of Price Unavailable. The schools near 6210 Overlook Rd include Peachtree Elementary School, Pinckneyville Middle School, and Norcross High School, which are all in the Elem School: Peachtree, High School: Norcross, and Middle School: Pinckneyville district. There are similar and nearby condo/townhome/row home/co-ops for sale include 505 Glenleaf Dr.

6210 Overlook Rd, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092
6210 Overlook Rd, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092

6210 Overlook Rd, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092 is a condo/townhome/row home/co-op for sale, and has been listed on the market for 10 days. 6210 Overlook Rd is in the Peachtree Corners neighborhood, which has a median listing price of $87,900. The median listing price for Peachtree Corners is 100% less than Peachtree Corners at $495,000, and 100% less than GA at $250,000. Nearby neighborhoods like have a median listing price of Price Unavailable. The schools near 6210 Overlook Rd include Peachtree Elementary School, Pinckneyville Middle School, and Norcross High School, which are all in the Elementary School: Peachtree, High School: Norcross, and Middle School: Pinckneyville district. There are similar and nearby condo/townhome/row home/co-ops for sale include 505 Glenleaf Dr.

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Property Details for 6180 Dove Field Ct

Property Details for 6180 Dove Field Ct

6180 Dove Field Ct, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092
6180 Dove Field Ct, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092
Property Features
Beds Total: 4
Baths Full: 3
Baths Half: 1 Main Full Baths: 1 Main Half Baths: 1 Upper Full Baths: 2
Dining Room Desc: Seats 12+, Separate Dng Rm
1-2 Step Entry Fenced Yard Garden Area Patio Prof Landscaping Lot Dimensions: 77x48x260x27x251 Approximate Lot Size: 1/3 to 1/2 Acre

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MetLife reveals design of its new “Midtown Union” project – Atlanta Business Chronicle

MetLife Inc. received conditional approval Tuesday to move ahead with its 9-acre mixed-use project in Midtown at 17th, Spring and West Peachtree.

The project, which includes a 25-story office tower and 250-key hotel, was presented to the Midtown Development Review Committee. Its suggestions for how the giant project should be scaled into the northern edge of Midtown, one of the city’s most walkable neighborhoods, will be passed on to the city of Atlanta for final approval.

“Midtown Union,” as the project is officially known, will also include up to 350 apartments and 87,000 square feet of retail.

The design will feature a connection between the Woodruff Arts Center and the mixed-use town center Atlantic Station, which stands across the 17th Street Bridge. Including “Union” in the project’s name reflects the idea of connection, said Tom Ryan with MetLife Investment Management. Midtown Union includes the latest in a series of newly unveiled Midtown towers. For example, Cousins Properties Inc. (NYSE: CUZ) recently revealed the design of its 30-story tower at 7th and 8th streets. Selig Development Co. has 1125 Peachtree St., which includes more than 200,000 square feet of office space. Greenstone Properties is also planning a 10-story building at 14th and Spring. It will be interesting to see when the towers move from concept to reality.

Hines said it will break ground this month on its new building at Atlantic Station. Plans for T3 were first introduced to the market almost three years ago. Hines confirmed it will move forward as a spec development.

MetLife Inc. (NYSE: MET) remains undecided if Midtown Union will start on a speculative basis, Ryan said. It plans to differentiate the project from others by focusing on its connectivity.

“Its location sets it apart in that it deliberately brings together business, the community, and the arts,” said Mike Sivewright, market director with Jones Lang LaSalle Inc. Its leading the Midtown Union development team.

The design derives from the art and landscape of its pedestrian promenade, said Bill Halter with Cooper Carry, the architect for the mixed-use development.

“Through this project, we will introduce a new standard of design to the workplace by establishing meaningful connections between people and nature,” he said.

Enlarge

T3: an $80 million project that echos the industrial roots of Atlantic Station.

Hines goes spec

A development partnership led by Hines will start construction this month on a new Atlantic Station office building, a sign of growing confidence in the market’s fundamentals.

Known as T3, the $80 million project will feature a design that echos the industrial roots of Atlantic Station, a former Midtown steel plant.

Hines, along with partners Invesco Real Estate and the nation’s second-largest public pension fund, California State Teachers Retirement System (CALSTRS), will begin work on the 230,000-square-foot building amid a historically restrained level of spec development, or projects started without office tenants signed to leases. In Midtown, only 725 Ponce — aka the former Murder Kroger — is underway as a spec office development. It includes 360,000 square feet of office space.

In recent years, Midtown has lured big corporate expansions, including Anthem Inc. and NCR Corp., along with numerous research and development centers around Technology Square.

Midtown’s office fundamentals have responded. Quoted office rents have jumped to more than $36 per square foot, a 21 percent year-over-year increase, said John Heagy, a senior managing director with Hines. In the first quarter of this year, office rental rates climbed more than 5 percent.

Midtown vacancy is hovering around 9 percent.

“We are seeing unprecedentedly low vacancy and an increase in rates that justifies new construction,” Heagy said.

T3 will officially break ground May 17. Hines wants to complete the building by summer of 2019.

New South Construction won the job as the project’s contractor.

It will be interesting to watch if more capital sources are confident they can justify underwriting the construction of new buildings and still have the ability to exit the deal, even when those costs exceed $400 a foot.

The restraint lenders have shown for new construction have allowed rents to not only soar. It’s provided an opportunity for towers such as Three Alliance in Buckhead to trade for such a high price. Because it had fewer new buildings to compete with for tenants, it was able to lease-up at higher rents.

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Buckhead Tower will be the new North American HQ for Networx Systems.

Real Talk
Networx Systems is relocating its North American headquarters to a 19-story office tower by Lenox Square. Networx Systems will relocate to Buckhead Tower, where it expects to nearly double to about 200 employees by 2020. CEO Steve Storch said the move is a significant upgrade from the company’s current offices at 8800 Roswell Rd. Networx needed more space and wanted an environment that could match its growth-oriented culture.The tower is adjacent to the Buckhead MARTA station and counts among its tenants State Bank, Gables Residential, Applied Systems and Crowe Howarth.April Parrish, Kirk Diamond, Erin Smith and Stephen Bellwood of Cushman & Wakefield secured the lease on behalf of Networx Systems. Adam Viente and Jeff Frantz of Jones Lang LaSalle represented the landlord of Buckhead Tower, Parmenter Realty Partners.Noro Management has picked up the Peachtree 25th building in south Buckhead for slightly more than $62 million, according to Fulton County property records. The seller was Peachtree 25th Property Owner LLC, an affiliate of Atlanta Property Group, or APG. It acquired the 365,560-square-foot building in the Brookwood area just north of SCAD Atlanta more than a decade ago. It invested in significant upgrades, including improvements to the building’s exterior.
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Marcoux is president of Opus MedStrategies Inc.

Opus MedStrategies Inc. is putting its North American HQ in Alpharetta. It will be housed at Sanctuary Park, Oak View I building. The company is taking a small space now, but its goal is to expand to at least 100 employees over the next few years, said Bob Marcoux, who is leading the expansion in Atlanta. Opus MedStrategies offers risk management and consulting for health care benefit plans and providers. Alpharetta’s history as a healthcare IT hub played a significant role in Opus MedStrategies choosing Sanctuary Park.A 21-building portfolio of suburban Atlanta business parks has traded hands for $41 million. The Ardent Companies acquired the 880,000 square feet of warehouse/flex properties. The two separate business park included nine buildings in Marietta’s Franklin Forest Business Park and another 12 in Norcross’ Northwoods Business Office Park. Ardent paid about $47 a foot, or $41.4 million, according to people familiar with the transaction. Managing Director Scott Werbel said the real estate company will start capital improvements to the properties and launch a strategy to attract new tenants.Ardent acquired the portfolio in a partnership with Axonic Capital LLC and Taconic Capital Advisors LP. Axonic is a New York based investment advisor founded by Clayton DeGiacinto in 2010. Taconic is a global institutional investment firm founded in 1999 by former Goldman Sachs partners Frank Brosens and Ken Brody. Ardent has completed several large transactions over the past year, including an expansion of its ownership in Buckhead’s Piedmont Center, where it now controls nine buildings and 63 percent of the project.After recently putting a trio of apartment buildings near SunTrust Park on the market, the Atlanta Braves may offer more pieces of The Battery mixed-use project to investors. Mark D. Carleton, CFO of parent company Liberty Media Corp., told analysts today that The Battery is performing “well above projections” and that the club will consider selling other pieces of it if that makes sense. “In general as we look at those projects down at The Battery, to the extent that we think it makes the most sense to sell those off to our partners or others, we’ll certainly look at those…” Carleton said. “So far, we are performing well above I think what our projections have been on lease-up and on revenue and on activity down there. So it’s going very well.” The Braves own part of the Omni Hotel and the Comcast building at The Battery. Carleton said being able to maintain the look and feel of SunTrust Park and The Battery the experience for fans is key. “We’ll be opportunistic as some of these projects get closer to completion and fully online,” he said. Liberty CEO Greg Maffei went a bit further. “We think the Battery combined with The Braves is a unique live experience. Our strength comes from developing interesting opportunities around that, including residential including office, including the Live Nation music environment we have there — all of those things. “But we don’t necessarily see ourselves as long-term holders of real estate assets,” he said. “We see ourselves as people developing interesting opportunities.”
ATLANTA RISING: The latest plans filed from across the region

Lawrenceville has unveiled plans for a new $26 million downtown arts center that will connect to the existing Aurora Theatre.

With more than 50,000 square feet of space, the new center will include the new 525-seat Cabaret theater, classroom and practice space and offices.

“This exciting project continues the transformation of the downtown area,” Lawrenceville Mayor Judy Jordan Johnson said. “Lawrenceville is the heart of Gwinnett [County] and maintains a central area rich with activity for all generations.

This facility will bring the arts community together with educational opportunities and all the other amenities that our vibrant community has to offer.”

The city is partnering with design firm Stevens & Wilkinson. A request for proposals has been issued to select a construction contractor during the next 60 days.

Construction is expected to begin early next year, and the project is due to be completed by mid-2020.

A developer is proposing two seven-story apartment buildings next to the Kensington MARTA station, according to plans filed with DeKalb County.

The 2.7-acre property along Memorial Drive would be developed with 218 one-two-and-three-bedroom units.

The site, which stands across from a fenced-off surface parking lot that once served the MARTA station, needs to be rezoned for high-density residential use, according to an application submitted to DeKalb County.

The developer, Kensington Station LLC, said the project will allow for higher-density residential uses around the station. It’s also proposing a six-story parking deck as part of the redevelopment.

The rezoning would become a spark for other projects within the Kensington-Memorial Drive Overlay district, according to the application.

A South Carolina developer has taken another step on a giant mixed-use project in Covington, Ga. that would feature multiple hotels, several hundred residential units and 400,000 square feet of retail.

The Foxfield Co., based in Bluffton, S.C., has submitted the project as a Development of Regional Impact, or DRI.

The process has triggered the Northeast Georgia Regional Commission to get involved to prepare for the development’s effect on local traffic and infrastructure.

The DRI typically reflects a project’s maximum density for an area, but it doesn’t necessarily mean it will be developed to that scale.

Covington Town Center is planned along Alcovy and City Pond roads. It would include 400,000 square feet of retail and commercial space, 400 residential units, 250,000 square feet of office space, and 450 hotel rooms, according to DRI filing.

The project would also rise close to a nearly 200-acre film studio and entertainment complex in Covington, which is about 35 miles east of Atlanta.

The Foxfield Co. could not be reached for comment, but President Harry Kitchen told Atlanta Business Chronicle last year that the town center project will get a boost from being developed near the studio.

Covington Town Center is expected to take at least five years to complete.

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The developers of what could become the largest new residential and commercial project dummy post

The developers of what could become the largest new residential and commercial project in the city of Chattanooga in decades say they want to build more than 400 homes around a 45,000-square-feet town village with neighborhood restaurants, stores and medical offices.

Plans for the 155-acre development near the former Dixie Yarns mill in Lupton City will be presented to the Chattanooga/Hamilton County Regional Planning Commission next month. But the preliminary plan for a town center, recreation trails and community gathering spaces in a "New Urbanism" design is already earning praise from local residents.

› Chattanooga businessman John T. Lupton in the 1920s bought 1,000 acres of farm land on the Tennessee River to develop a manufacturing community called Lupton City for the yarn and thread maker then known as Dixie Mercerizing Co. As business grew, houses, a post office, church, gym, movie theater, swimming pool and golf course were built.

› R.L. Stowe Mills acquires Dixie Yarns in 1998 and operates the mill until it shuts down in 2009.

› BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee bought 210 acres near the mill in 2001 for a new corporate campus, but abandoned those plans in favor of building its headquarters downtown on Cameron Hill.

dummy post

Additional Information About 4353 Whitecap Ln, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092

4353 Whitecap Ln, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092
4353 Whitecap Ln, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092
Bedrooms Upper: 3
Baths Full Upper: 2
Breakfast Room

*School data provided by National Center for Education Statistics, Pitney Bowes, and GreatSchools. Intended for reference only. GreatSchools Ratings compare a school’s test performance to statewide results. To verify enrollment eligibility, contact the school or district directly.

Year Taxes Land Additions Total Assessment 2017 Price Not Available $24,000 + $71,960 = $95,960 2016 $3,420 $24,000 + $66,520 = $90,520 2015 $3,461 $24,000 + $66,520 = $90,520

The price and tax history data displayed is obtained from public records and/or MLS feeds from the local jurisdiction. Contact your REALTOR® directly in order to obtain the most up-to-date information available.

4353 Whitecap Ln, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092
4353 Whitecap Ln, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092
Upper Bedrooms: 3
Baths Full: 2
Dining Room Desc: Separate Dng Rm Kitchen Features: Breakfast Room, Cabinets White, Counter Top – Stone, Pantry

*School data provided by National Center for Education Statistics, Pitney Bowes, and GreatSchools. Intended for reference only. GreatSchools Ratings compare a school’s test performance to statewide results. To verify enrollment eligibility, contact the school or district directly.

Year Taxes Land Additions Total Assessment 2017 Price Not Available $24,000 + $71,960 = $95,960 2016 $3,420 $24,000 + $66,520 = $90,520 2015 $3,461 $24,000 + $66,520 = $90,520

The price and tax history data displayed is obtained from public records and/or MLS feeds from the local jurisdiction. Contact your REALTOR® directly in order to obtain the most up-to-date information available.

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Mixed-use development proposed for Lupton City riverfront property

Mixed-use development proposed for Lupton City riverfront property

The developers of what could become the largest new residential and commercial project in the city of Chattanooga in decades say they want to build more than 400 homes around a 45,000-square-feet town village with neighborhood restaurants, stores and medical offices.

Plans for the 155-acre development near the former Dixie Yarns mill in Lupton City will be presented to the Chattanooga/Hamilton County Regional Planning Commission next month. But the preliminary plan for a town center, recreation trails and community gathering spaces in a "New Urbanism" design is already earning praise from local residents.

› Chattanooga businessman John T. Lupton in the 1920s bought 1,000 acres of farm land on the Tennessee River to develop a manufacturing community called Lupton City for the yarn and thread maker then known as Dixie Mercerizing Co. As business grew, houses, a post office, church, gym, movie theater, swimming pool and golf course were built.

› R.L. Stowe Mills acquires Dixie Yarns in 1998 and operates the mill until it shuts down in 2009.

› BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee bought 210 acres near the mill in 2001 for a new corporate campus, but abandoned those plans in favor of building its headquarters downtown on Cameron Hill.

› Lupton City LLC, a real estate partnership connected to the Dockery Group in Peachtree City, Ga., buys the 12-acre mill site in 2012 and tears down the mill to recycle usable bricks, metal and wood. But the reclamation effort stops after several months before the mill site is cleaned up and after wood planks treated with creosote are exposed, leaving the mill as a Brownfield site.

› In 2017, the city acquires the mill site after Lupton City LLC fails to pay property taxes. Chattanooga budgets $1.5 million for cleanup.

› Riverton Development Group bought 210 acres in Lupton City in January 2018 for $8.1 million and began preparing plans for housing, commercial and recreational complex

See the Riverton development plan.

Known as "Riverton" for the riverfront site in Lupton City, the proposed $200 million-plus development is expected to be built out over the next five or six years if the layout and zoning is approved by the planning commission and City Council. The first phase will include the Village Center at the entrance to Riverton on part of the current 9-hole Lupton City Golf Course. The town center off of Lupton Drive is being designed to include retail, dining, recreation and office space options with space for 70 residential units on the top floors above the new storefronts.

Sponsored by Connatix

About 58 townhomes will surround the village center, and about 355 single-family homes are planned throughout the entire Riverton neighborhood, extending to the banks of the Tennessee River.

"It was really important to us to receive input from the surrounding neighborhoods, and we’re excited for them to see how we incorporated the feedback into the master plan for Riverton," said Becky Cope English, a Chattanooga Realtor and partner in the development. "The result is a community that’s planned with people in mind and a life they want to enjoy."

Mark Mullins, president of the Fairfax Heights/Bagwell City Neighborhood Association, said Lupton City residents are generally supportive of the Riverton proposal.

"We recognized that ultimately this site was going to be developed and we’re very pleased to see a plan that should improve our community and is so welcoming to neighboring development," Mullins said. "I think this will enhance the value of our homes and help this entire area of town."

Lawton Haygood, who recently opened the Side Track restaurant on Hixson Pike near Lupton Drive, also welcomed the project, even if it might bring another restaurant competitor or two.

"We think we have something unique so we’re not worried about another competitor and we think this should be another great asset to this part of town," Haygood said.

As outlined in the Riverton Master Plan, more than a fourth of the total site will remain undeveloped to offer natural community spaces. Riverton will also preserve existing wetlands and streams that crisscross the property.

English said the developers were inspired to design the village center and residences from successful communities like Serenbe, Hammonds Ferry and Vickery in Georgia, Mt. Laurel near Birmingham, Ala., Palmetto Bluff in South Carolina and Westhaven near Franklin, Tenn.

"The main thread throughout all of these communities is that they were planned for how people want to live," English said. "We are building upon the style of those vibrant neighborhoods and creating a happy, healthy and active environment, where people of all generations and backgrounds will live, work and play together."

As people enter the neighborhood, English said they will travel on tree-lined streets with sidewalks and parallel parking bordering the roadway. A wide, tree-lined median and walking path will divide the main road cutting through the center of the neighborhood.

At its terminus, a pedestrian pathway will lead residents to the Tennessee River. Beyond the village center, neighborhood amenities will include recreation and gathering areas as well as river access for paddleboarding and kayaking.

The development group planning Riverton, organized as a limited partnership, bought 210 acres in January from BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee, which acquired the land a decade ago with plans to locate its corporate campus on the site. At the urging of then Chattanooga Mayor Bob Corker, BlueCross ultimately changed its plans and instead erected its $300 million headquarters complex atop Cameron Hill in downtown Chattanooga.

The Lupton City site — the largest undeveloped riverfront site in the city of Chattanooga — is part of nearly 1,000 acres the late John T. Lupton acquired a century ago to create the Lupton City mill and surrounding mill town for Dixie Mercerizing Co., when the company began in 1920.

The Dixie mill, which was sold to R.L. Stowe Co., in 1998, ultimately shut down in 2009 and the mill was later toppled by a real estate group that failed to clean up the site.

The 12-acre mill site along Mercer Road, which has been left largely as a pile of brick rubble for the past four years, was ultimately acquired by the city of Chattanooga after the previous owners failed to pay overdue property taxes. The city budgeted $1.5 million to clean up to site and plans to try to sell it for redevelopment by next year.

The city’s plans for the cleanup last year were delayed while city officials worked to gain state regulatory approval for the clean up of the creosote wood contamination exposed during the demolition by the former owners.

Donna Williams, director of the city’s Department of Economic and Community Development, told the local neighborhood group last month that the city will open bids for the clean up in May and she hopes to have contractors working on the site to clear the mill debris by this summer.

Cleaning up the unsightly mill rubble "will go a long way to help our community," Mullins said.

Becky Cope English, a partner with Riverton Development…

Adjacent to the mill site on Mercer Road, Greentech Homes also is planning to build 30 new single-family, detached homes on the site and nearby property of the former Lupton City Post Office and community gym.

Former Chattanooga City Councilman Chris Anderson, director of development and government relations for Greentech, said the home building company expects to submit a rezoning petition and development plans to city planners in time for the June meeting of the Chattanooga/Hamilton County Regional Planning Commission.

The Greentech site is now zoned M-1 manufacturing because it was once part of the former textile mill. But Anderson said Greentech will likely request an RTZ (urban overlay) zoning with the condition that the company will only build single-family detached homes on the property.

"We are still in the planning stages, but we anticipate the houses will be in the 1,800- to 2,000-square-foot range in size and we’re shooting to price the new homes in the $250,000 to $275,000 range," Anderson said last week. "There is really strong neighborhood in Lupton City and we want to be good partners with them as we add to all that is coming in this part of town as the city cleans up the mill site. We want to take what has been a blighted piece of property and make it a beautiful addition to this neighborhood."

Contact Dave Flessner at dflessner@timesfreepress.com or at 757-6340.

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Baby boomers leaving suburbs for fun in the city

As a large and wealthy generation, Boomers are opting to forgo suburban life for city amenitites

As the baby boomer generation ages, many are forgoing their suburban lifestyle to live in the busier cities, close to urban amenities

ATLANTA—Twenty years ago, it seemed everyone was moving out into the suburbs. And now, depending on who you talk to, everyone is moving back to the city.

That’s especially true among baby boomers, those of us born between 1946 and 1964.

Why?

Their nests are empty. They are over the big houses, with big lawns and swimming pools in constant need of maintenance. And when you happen to be one of the largest generations — an estimated 74.9 million of us in the United States — and the wealthiest generation ever to retire, developers and businesses start to notice.

Andy Isakson first noticed back in the ‘90s.

At the time, he said, his parents were looking at their retirement options, and although they had spent nearly their entire lives in real estate, they never found what they wanted.

When his father passed, Isakson and his siblings took turns caring for their mother, who had dementia.

“Over the last five years of her life, she had to move five times,” said Isakson.

Each time the disease progressed, the siblings were forced to move her to a place better suited to care for her.

“From a consumer standpoint, I knew there had to be a better way,” Isakson said.

In 2002, eight years after his mother passed away, Isakson opened Park Springs, a resort-style retirement community adjacent to Stone Mountain Park. He is poised to open Peachtree Hills Place, a second smaller community for those 55 and older in the Buckhead area of Atlanta, next summer.

“Location is everything in real estate,” said Kevin Isakson, principal for Isakson Living and Andy Isakson’s nephew. “We’ve always known there was a strong demand for this intown offering for folks who don’t want to abandon their urban lifestyle.”

Peachtree Hills Place will come complete with restaurants, a fitness center, indoor swimming pool and health clinic, the one thing his parents needed most.

Andy Isakson, 65, grew up in Brookhaven, Ga., with two other siblings, including U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson. He graduated from the old Dykes High School, now Sutton Middle School, before heading to Vanderbilt University, where he earned an economics degree in 1974.

He abandoned city life for the suburbs the moment he returned, married and started building a family, which by the way, are all the things that tend to tie people down.

It helped, of course, that there was no traffic but, well, that was then.

Just as the traffic patterns changed, so too have populations.

For several decades before the 2000 census, the city of Atlanta, for instance, had been steadily losing population. Then from 2010-2017, it grew by 7 per cent, adding 9,900 new residents in the past year compared to 4,800 the year before.

Atlantans, 60 years and older, currently make up 10 per cent of the population, and that number is expected to double by 2030, making Atlanta one of the fastest-aging cities in America.

How many are migrating back into the city?

That’s hard to say, said Mike Alexander, director of the Center for Livable Communities at the Atlanta Regional Commission.

“The hard data really isn’t there, but I think like everyone else anecdotally we do see a trend of people moving back to the core,” Alexander said. “I see it all around me personally.”

Gregg Logan, managing director of RCLCO, a real estate advisory services firm that does market research for real estate companies all over the country, said the journey back into town is a big enough trend that there is a ready market for developers and others targeting boomers.

While about half of boomers who retire are happy to age in place, Logan said that about 15 per cent opt to move into the city to partake in urban amenities like restaurants, shopping, culture, all the things you find are more prevalent in the city and that Isakson points to.

And even if Buckhead is out of the question economically, downtown Duluth, Suwanee or Roswell may be within reach.

“There’s a ‘want-driven’ market and a ‘need-driven’ market,” Logan said. “The want-driven market is lifestyle oriented, they’re active adults age 55 to 65 moving back in town to have fun, socialize and enjoy all the urban amenities. That’s the market we’re seeing the biggest uptick in the market for. They’ve decided ‘urban’ is more exciting than living in the suburbs.

“The need-driven market includes those in their late 60s or older who move to independent living communities, where there is meal service, and those in their 70s or older who move to an assisted living facility. ALFs offer meal service and varying degrees of assistance with daily living, including skilled nursing and memory care. That’s a different, more medically driven market.”

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Peachtree City’s newest industry brings 20 jobs

SILON representatives were joined by govenment and industry guests at the April 12 ribbon-cutting at the company’s $20 million industrial plant in Peachtree City. Pictured, from left, are SILON Plant Manager Scott Whiteside, CFO Dr. Bernd Morawitz, CEO Dr. Wolfgang Riediger, COO Drahomir Koudelka and Technical Services and QA Manager Carl Mahabir. Photo/Submitted.

The ribbon-cutting for Peachtree City’s newest industry was held on April 12. SILON, a leading producer of technical compounds and polyester staple fibers, will create more than 20 jobs and invest $20 million in a new Peachtree City facility located off Ga. Highway 74 South.

Above, SILON representatives were joined by government and industry guests at the April 12 ribbon-cutting at the company’s $20 million industrial plant in Peachtree City. Pictured, from left, are SILON Plant Manager Scott Whiteside, CFO Dr. Bernd Morawitz, CEO Dr. Wolfgang Riediger, COO Drahomir Koudelka and Technical Services and QA Manager Carl Mahabir. Photo/Submitted.

“SILON is thrilled to open a new production site here in the U.S.,” said Dr. Wolfgang Riediger, company CEO. “This will bring us one step closer to our U.S. customers so we can better suit their needs.”

The SILON facility on Sierra Drive off Hwy. 74 South will be used for manufacturing, warehousing and storage purposes. The newly created jobs include positions in engineering, management and production.

Headquartered in the Czech Republic, SILON produces and sells polyolefin-based performance compounds and polyester fibers for use in the construction, automotive, and medical industries, among others.

“On behalf of Peachtree City, I am so pleased to welcome SILON to our Industrial Park,” Peachtree City Mayor Vanessa Fleisch said in a previous statement. “Peachtree City’s many industries play a vital role in making this great community, and we appreciate the investment SILON is making here. We look forward to working with SILON as they expand their business in our wonderful city.”

Commenting on the arrival of SILON in Peachtree City, Gov. Nathan Deal in a previous statement said, “Georgia’s top-ranked business environment continues to attract international firms like SILON to our state. In choosing Fayette County for this facility, SILON will find the logistics infrastructure and well-trained workforce necessary to support customers in a range of industries. I’m pleased to welcome SILON to the growing number of international companies creating jobs for Georgians and investing in our communities.”

Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) Project Manager Joseph Huntemann represented the Global Commerce division in partnership with the Fayette County Development Authority (FCDA).

“The Fayette County Development Authority was pleased to partner with SILON to assist in its location in Peachtree City and Fayette County,” said FCDA Chairman Darryl Hicks. “SILON will be a great asset for our community, both from the job perspective and for the capital investment they will add to our economy. In addition, we look forward to the cultural experiences that will be exchanged as a result of this international company’s addition to our family.”

SILON was founded in 1950 as a state-owned company near Tabor, Czech Republic, and is now one of the top producers of polyester fibers and polyolefin based compounds in Europe. SILON specializes in tailor-made solutions, creating products with very specific properties for a wide range of applications, according to SILON.

“We are excited to welcome SILON to Georgia, as they join a league of elite companies with manufacturing operations in the state,” said GDEcD Commissioner Pat Wilson. “We’ve become a global destination for international companies who are looking to drive innovation and expand their global footprint. I look forward to the success SILON will see in Peachtree City.”

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